Louise Chunn


Launched by Louise Chunn (above) at the end of 2013, welldoing.org is a site devoted to helping you get better in mind and body by connecting with the best people for you. We have gathered a wide range of information, tips and advice about all aspects of health and wellbeing, alongside our innovative therapist directory of professional mind and body practitioners from across the UK. We hope that like our name, welldoing, we can empower you to build the happiest, healthiest version of yourself.

Some key aspects of welldoing.org are:

  • Our innovative therapist directory which leads you to the most suitable therapist or counsellor for your needs. All our practitioners are members of reputable therapy associations; trainee therapists and counsellors are included only when their training organisations have deemed them “fit to practice", and their profiles are clearly labelled. The Body Practitioners Directory is coming soon too.
  • Our regularly updated content which includes articles and tips from experts, such as counsellors, psychotherapists and psychologists, alongside real-life stories from people who want to share their own experiences.
  • Input from our users about what they read on the site, and via social media. Follow us on Twitter Facebook or Google+ and do share your thoughts and feelings with us. We would love to hear from you.


Who we are

Louise Chunn is a prize-winning journalist who has edited magazines such as Psychologies, In Style and Good Housekeeping, and worked on The Guardian and Vogue. She was invited onto Google's initial Founders over 50 scheme in London, and was the only UK participant in Blackbox #13, a highly respected two-week accelerator course in Palo Alto. 

Adam Bent is commercial director. He has been a partner and director for over 25 start-ups covering 10 sectors and three countries. As a professional generalist, Adam works as an integrator for Louise, implementing the strategy to the creative brief.

Jamie Grand is an experienced, Zend-certified programmer.

Alice McGurran is a recent graduate from the Masters of Arts programme in English Literature and French at Edinburgh University.


What's the reaction to our therapist directory?

Since the welldoing.org site and therapist directory has gone live, we have had a great response from users, experts and the media. In April 2016 the gold standard of UK health sites NHS Choices linked to us as a recommended service for psychotherapy and counselling

nhs choices


From clients

Thousands of users have filled in our questionnaire to find the therapist or counsellor most suitable to them. Here are comments from a handful of those who found the best therapists for them on welldoing.org:

“I read about welldoing.org and recommended the therapist directory to my troubled adult daughter. She quickly found a warm, wonderful and incredibly helpful counsellor there. Neither of us had known quite how to find someone who ticked all the boxes: a 'talker', female, not too 'old', who could help with bereavement and other issues that were crippling her self-confidence. Already I see a transformation in her; her dad would have been so proud.”

“After witnessing a suicide attempt by a close relative, my daughters needed to get professional support quickly in order to help them process the trauma. Welldoing.org enabled us to get the support immediately and offered an easy step-by-step process to ensure we were able to tailor the right therapist to the different needs and ages of my daughters. Highly recommended.”

“Before I found my therapist on welldoing.org, I felt very sad and lost. The year before, I'd had a three year relationship end; I struggled to feel happy and excited about anything, and I found work very difficult. We did a variety of things, like talking to an empty chair as if it was my ex-boyfriend, to release all my feelings about the breakup. She also let me see that life does have changes, and that I could tolerate them, given some tools and techniques that she taught me.”


From our members

"As a therapist, I value being part of the Welldoing.org community. Not only do I receive client referrals through the site, but also get the opportunity to write articles and raise awareness about different subjects. I also enjoy regularly checking in with the latest updates and news on health and wellbeing at the site, and interacting with the staff. Their approach is very warm, personal, professional and helpful. I have felt valued and supported as a therapist on the directory rather than simply being another person on the list." Harriet Frew, integrative therapist specialising in eating disorders

"Welldoing.org is a site which provides informed and accessible information on a broad range of mental health issues and indeed wellbeing issues. Its directory uses a wide variety of search criteria which helps the client find the therapist with the best ‘fit’ and this makes a big difference to the successful outcome of therapy." Sue Cowan-Jenssen, integrative psychotherapist

"Clients often speak of not really knowing what they need, only a vague idea that they want to change something in their lives. The advantage of Welldoing is that it asks you to fill in a questionnaire, which helps people think of what may be best suited for them and what it is they may be struggling with. It eliminates some of the unknowns which are part of making such an important decision." Gilead Yeffett, Gestalt relationship therapist


From the media

Click to view full article:


The Telegraph Welldoing Coverage  The Spectator Welldoing coverage

a life enhancing idea 

"A life enhancing idea"


find a therapist 

"The easy way to get help in finding a therapist"

"Type 'find a therapist for anxiety' into Google and you'll get bombarded with adverts and promises of help and enough jargon to send your heart rate into overdrive. There are currently around 400 types of therapy available in the UK so finding the right one for you, in the right place and at the right price, can be guesswork. Thankfully, welldoing.org is a mental health, self-development and wellbeing website designed to match patients with therapists"  


image 

"To find a therapist, I recommend the register on welldoing.org" Red Agony Aunt, Philippa Perry

image 

"welldoing.org is my favourite to find a therapist" The Pool Agony Aunt, Viv Groskop


From wellbeing and mental health experts

Alain de Botton founder of The School of Life:

“The welldoing.org therapist directory is an intelligent, modern response to a need – how do you find the right therapist for you? Taking into account your personality and goals, and what various therapists have to offer, it finds the best possible match. I think it deserves to succeed.”

Andrew Samuels former chair of the UKCP:

“The questionnaire, which mixes practical questions with a potential client's attitudes, is unique. It is a much better way to match therapist and client than anything I have seen up to now, and both sides of the equation will benefit.”

Alastair Campbell journalist, mental health activist and author of The Happy Depressive: In Pursuit of Personal and Political Happiness:

“Mental health is one of the great issues of our time and welldoing.org is a welcome addition to the groups and services which are making us open up about mental health, mental illness and issues of wellbeing. We all have to fight for changes in attitudes so that governments and people give mental health the same priority and understanding as physical health.”

Philippa Perry non-practising psychotherapist and author of How To Stay Sane: The School of Life:

"Once you find a suitable therapist with whom you click, therapy has the best chance of working, but it has taken a non-therapist, Louise Chunn, to look into how to make a match between therapist and potential client less a matter of chance. Every therapist on the welldoing.org therapist directory, in addition to having recognised qualifications, has to fill in a client-centric questionnaire. The point of such questions is to make the best match with a potential client who will also fill in a questionnaire that sums up their expectations and needs.”


From celebrity advocates

Allison Pearson Telegraph columnist and author of I Don't Know How She Does It:

“As someone who suffers from clinical depression, while trying to hold down a job and raise a family, I find welldoing.org both a comfort and an inspiration. It feels friendly and very easy to dip in and out of, while offering superb advice about how to find people and experiences that can make you – and keep you – well. I really love it and have recommended welldoing.org to several women who have found the site invaluable. It's exactly what the doctor ordered for this crazy world of ours!”

Kathy Lette novelist and author of The Boy Who Fell To Earth, about raising a son with autism:

“Why I like welldoing.org is because it's upfront, direct, accessible and doesn't use any psychological jargon…like 'obfuscatory jargon'! Mental health is so stigmatised, but stripping off to your emotional underwear is the only way to get better. A psychological disrobing reveals all, and sharing and talking is the the best way to heal. Welldoing.org doesn't assume everyone wants to go into therapy, but if you do want to understand more about your mental topography, then this is a good place to get orientated.”

Rachel Kelly author of Black Rainbow: How Words Healed Me: My Journey Through Depression:

“Welldoing.org is a brilliant pool of resources for those trying to live a happy and healthy life – so that means its useful for everyone. There's plenty here to help with tackling so many everyday obstacles and anxieties, as well as considered advice on how to go about developing a consistent and long-term state of mental wellness. I am particularly impressed by their bespoke therapist directory. As someone who has benefited so markedly from therapy myself, but who also took several attempts to find a therapist who could address my needs, I am a firm advocate of this service.”

We hope you'll find our site and therapist directory just as useful, as well as informative, interesting and trustworthy. Please let us know what you think. You can contact us here.

Last modified May 4 2016