Read our posts about wellbeing

7 Myths about Changing your Relationship with Food

7 Myths about Changing your Relationship with Food

Do you ever feel that your relationship with food is doomed to failure? How can you truly break old habits and move to a relaxed and enjoyable place where you can eat out effortlessly and feel proud and comfortable of your body? Maybe you feel that you can skip along quite happily for a few weeks and then suddenly, wham, bam, you are back to flicking furiously through diet magazines for the latest craze; weighing yourself obsessively twice a day and piling on the body self-loathing with intensity. Why? Why? You really thought that this time you had it sussed. Here...
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Green Gyms: Wellbeing through Outdoor Conservation

Green Gyms: Wellbeing through Outdoor Conservation

Green Gyms transform people’s health and wellbeing through participation in outdoor conservation activity. They are group-based, physically challenging and result in green spaces for the wider public benefit. Regular attendees increase their activity over time and so get fitter. They also develop a social, or ‘peer-support’ network, and have higher levels of contact with nature. This powerful combination helps them to develop resilience against mental and physical health problems and - through learning how to manage green space - new skills, knowledge and...
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10 Reasons to Adjust your Relationship with Food

10 Reasons to Adjust your Relationship with Food

Harriet Frew is a therapist who specialises in disordered eating. Here are her reasons why this year should be the one you finally sort out your relationship with food, for good: 1) Because life is too darned short to be filling your head with thoughts about the calorie content of your next meal or the size of your bottom. 60,000 thoughts per day – let’s use some of this thinking time for stuff that really matters! 2) Because you know deep-down that the next diet is NOT going to be the magic wand that fixes your relationship with food once and for all and gets...
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5 wellbeing resolutions for 2015

5 wellbeing resolutions for 2015

It’s a tricky time of year. Money can be tight after Christmas, exercise may have taken a back seat whilst you have instead indulged in second helpings. So many things to feel bad about and resolve to fix. Then there’s the build of up the big night on New Years eve, which - whether it was good or a bit of a let down - will leave most starting the year with a deathly hangover which you push aside, swearing it’s your last, and aiming to start fresh and embrace the whole new you in 2015. A whole new you is a whole lot of pressure to put on yourself, especially...
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Why is Saying no so Hard?

Why is Saying no so Hard?

Do you know how to say “no”? It’s such a small word but often one of the most difficult to say. Those of us who feel uncomfortable saying no are actually doing ourselves are disservice and often struggle with healthy boundaries. So what are boundaries? Boundaries are a way in which we keep ourselves mentally healthy and safe. We can see and feel physical boundaries. Have you ever had the experience of speaking to someone and feeling he or she was just too close? You move away and he or she still moves in on your space. We can see and feel these boundaries but...
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Why Dog Walking is Good for You

Why Dog Walking is Good for You

‘Alpha got lost for five hours,’ says one of the regular dog people as Albie, her working cocker spaniel, races around the park. ‘He followed a bitch on heat for miles, all the way to the main road. Now his mum’s had him snipped and she’s bought a tracking device’. We gasp in horror at the trauma. Alpha is a husky. I know him well, as does my dog Milo, a miniature schnauzer, who adores being pinned down by him and gently bitten on the neck. I don’t know his owner’s name (yes, I’m aware that the term ‘owner’ is seen in some rarified circles as non-pc, too clinical,...
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Using Mindfulness to Overcome Insomnia Part 5

Using Mindfulness to Overcome Insomnia Part 5

This is the last of our extracts from Dr Guy Meadows' fantastic work The Sleep Book: How to Sleep Well Every Night on using mindfulness to overcome insomnia. The Sleep School also run workshops, find out more. Noticing Your Sensations and Urges Every moment of every day your body sends you millions of messages in the form of emotions, sensations and urges about your state of well-being. Whether it is the beat of your heart, the twitch of your muscles or the sensation of feeling hungry, tired, excited or sad, they are all part of the human experience. They provide you...
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Can Making the Bed Change Your Life?

Can Making the Bed Change Your Life?

Have you ever wondered what an unmade bed says about you? could the way you leave your bed each morning reflect your state of mind?   In the sixties my family lived in one room on the top floor of a terraced house in South London. The bed took centre stage and if left unmade would throw the whole room into disarray. With the bed made, the room would take on a certain glow and everything else that needed to be tidied would fall into place. There are psychological as well as environmental benefits of a well-made bed. In a recent article, Make Your Bed For Peace...
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Using Mindfulness to Overcome Insomnia Part 4

Using Mindfulness to Overcome Insomnia Part 4

Another helpful extract from Dr Guy Meadows'The Sleep Book: How to Sleep Well Every Night on how to use mindfulness to overcome insomnia. Noticing Your Breath The regularity of our breath makes it an excellent anchor to the present moment, and the fact we can do it at any time and it’s free makes it a great mindfulness tool, and a great tool in using mindfulness to overcome insomnia. It’s also one of the most easily observable bodily sensations, which is why meditators, new and experienced, practise it. Exercise: Noticing Your Breath In this exercise you will...
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9 Tips to Help with Seasonal Affective Disorder

9 Tips to Help with Seasonal Affective Disorder

Seasonal Affective Disorder is a cyclical depressive period which usually occurs in autumn and winter. Sufferers are plagued with symptoms such as fatigue, increased appetite, loss of interest in daily activities, loss of libido, inability to focus and feelings of anxiety and irritability. People may automatically turn to alcohol and drugs to self-medicate, which in turn can make symptoms worse. SAD is thought to be caused by the lack of sunlight in the winter months. The lack of sunlight is thought to affect the functioning of your hypothalamus, the part of your...
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